True or false: The World Vets Technical Animal Course rocked

“What time does your flight land?”

My husband asks me this every time I go to Nicaragua (OK, it’s only been twice, but still.) He asks because the State Department brief on Nicaragua mentions armed robberies along the highways at night, and he is worried that this will happen to me. And I appreciate his concern, I do, but I sometimes wonder what the State Department would say if it were telling travelers what to do when travelling out of LAX, an airport I lived by for 5 years, or what he would have said had he known I was hopping into a taxi by myself at 1 am in Nairobi, something he didn’t think twice about when I mentioned it after the fact but everyone who has actually BEEN to Nairobi thought was a particularly gutsy stupid thing to do.

The point is, you take calculated risks all the time in life, and do the best you can to protect yourself, because at the end of the day the coolest things in life require that tiny element of risk. Why did the chicken cross the road and all of that. Despite wanting to be able to talk about my mad danger cred, I have to be honest: not all countries in Central and South America can say the same, but Nicaragua was not a worrisome destination for me. At all.

For those who don’t recall why I am talking about Nicaragua, I was there a few weeks ago as part of the Inaugural Technical Animal Rescue course with World Vets. I didn’t talk about it too much beforehand for the simple fact that I really didn’t know what we were going to be doing, other than ‘learning technical animal rescue’ and that I would need a life preserver, but the element of surprise is what makes these adventures so great. And because I ended the course with a test, you get one too. That’s how we roll here. That’s how you LEARN, people.

True or false: Most travelers to Nicaragua end up robbed, jailed, or otherwise victimized.

The area of Nicaragua we were in (Granada) feels very safe. Violent crime is certainly more rare than it is here in San Diego, and the only assault I had was on my dignity during that awkward massage (but I digress). All that stuff you hear about the terrible Nicaraguan jails on Locked Up Abroad? Told by people who were smuggling drugs. Don’t do that. This place is crawling with tourists, who come with money to spend, and the community doesn’t want to jeopardize that by showing people a bad time.

True or false: Granada is ugly.

Granada is gorgeous. It is one of the oldest cities in the Americas, founded in 1542. That means there are lots of old, old churches;

Strange incongruous city blocks whose architecture depends on what century it was built in and which pirate burned it down;

And walls stretching to the horizon, punctuated by doors that lead into the unknown; could be a pharmacy. Could be a pile of rubble. Or it could be a beautifully manicured courtyard, such as that at Casa la Merced, where we were fortunate enough to stay.

I opened my bedroom door to this every day. Hideous.

True or false: World Vets hired some random bozo to teach the course as a front because we all just wanted to go to Granada.

On the first day of the course, we met our instructor, Kim Little from Rescue 3. The first thing we learned about him is that he has been teaching rescue courses professionally for three decades.

The second thing I learned is that he is teaching us the same material taught to the HSUS Disaster Response team and all the other big players you see on the news when disasters happen domestically. So we learned the real deal, FEMA certified, official course. By the way, if you ever invite Kim over for dinner, which you should, ask him to tell you stories from his rescue work during Hurricane Katrina. There’s a story with a tiger, and another story involving a massive pig, a crate, and a film crew.

And the third thing I learned was:

SAFETY FIRST

This is important, as I will get to when I talk about how during lake practice I accidentally demonstrated how one might accidentally kill both oneself and one’s victim during a water rescue, if one forgets this cardinal law.

True or false: Technical Animal Rescue involves the most complicated and expensive elaborate machinery that exists.

After our first day doing classwork, reviewing the hydrodynamics of swift water rescue and me getting to gleefully nerd out on vectors and flow diagrams, we sat down with the meat and potatoes of any rescue team: bags of ropes and carabiners.

It’s amazing what you can do with rope. No, really.

We spent more time doing knots than anything else in this course. Knots, and knots, and more knots. Knots that swivel and knots that pull and knots with two loops and knots that lay flat.

Those who have done climbing fared better than the others, but we all got it eventually. Dr. Augusto Barragan from Panama, seen here with Dr. Lester Tapia from Granada, was particularly adept. He spent a lot of time sitting opposite me trying to explain in his non-native language what I was doing wrong.

Answer: taking too many pictures.

Jen, having quickly mastered the lessons due to her climbing experience, started to freestyle.

Kim had but three precious days to whip this motley bunch of veterinary do-gooders into cool, calm rescue pros who could grab a duffle bag of ropes and clips, look over the edge of a ravine at a dog and human in distress, and figure out how to magically transform those tools into a successful rescue. After that first day of tumbled knots, things were looking grim, but we persevered.

Day One: The newly formed team gathers at the defunct Granada train station, wondering what we had in store.

But did we learn enough? Stay tuned.

Filed: Adventures, Blog, Daily Life, Disaster Response, Features Tagged: , , ,
  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1363015727 Michelle Cotton

    It looks beautiful there. What a rough training job. LOL I would completely fail that course, mainly because me and any sort of rope, hose, or cord are always at total odds with each other. Never fails. It’s my curse. That and complete lack of grace. I’ll be the one needing rescuing simply because I tripped over my own feet. ;-)

    • http://www.pawcurious.com Dr. V

      What I liked the most was the idea of a team. There are so many jobs that if you are crummy at being the actual in the water rescue person (that would be me being crummy), there is another place you would probably excel (like making sure the supplies are organized and ready to go, a less sexy but just as vital position.)

  • Sue W.

    Your pictures are fabulous and I thank God there are people like you, and your “classmates” and disaster response teams, and instructors like Kim Little! Because I’m with Michelle…it will be my own feet that is my undoing.

    Thank you for sharing, again! (By the by – and I NEVER see this in your blog so I hesitate to even mention it – misspelling – “complicated”: True or false: Technical Animal Rescue involves the most conplicated and expensive elaborate machinery that exists.

    • http://www.pawcurious.com Dr. V

      OH AUGH TYPO KILL IT WITH FIRE thank you.

  • Tamara

    The rope part sounds hard! I’m terrible at tying knots. I’m really glad this training is offered to the group. What a excellent program by World Vets. I am continually impressed :)

    • http://www.pawcurious.com Dr. V

      I loved that it was focused on animals but broad enough so that I have some basic competence in human rescue too. Because where’s the one, there’s often the other. :D

  • Cathey

    Lovely post – yeah, I have to say Nicaragua would make me nervous, but it IS beautiful. And I agree, the double use of the information taught is a real bonus. Thanks for sharing, Dr. V!

  • Spudzee

    I’m signing up for one of the July classes. Love World Vets. Went to Ecuador this past fall and met great people. A great experience!

  • ErikaS

    I am going December 27th! Thank you for sharing, I am so excited! I am a second year veterinary student and I hope to learn a lot!