Cures what ails ya

In the olden days, people used to turn to carnival medicine men or the back pages of Look Magazine for the latest way to solve all of their problems. People don’t change, just the technology. Now we have the internet to turn to. If the web is to be believed, and it always is for some reason, there is a new cure for all the world’s ills. That cure is coconut oil.

hair

It’s good for your hair, your skin, your GI tract, your dog, your mental health, and your aura. It’s anti-inflammation and pro-synergy. You can rub it on your scalp, then scrape it off and use it to cook, or sit on the leather couch and make it more supple. I don’t think there is a single malady out there that someone has not suggested coconut oil can fix:

Dry skin? Coconut oil.

Dry face? Coconut oil.

Yeast infection? You guessed it.

Alzheimer’s? Eat up.

Athlete’s foot, acne, depression, hemorrhoids, anxiety, UTI, weight loss, heartburn, autism. I guess what I’m saying is you could nuke your local CVS and be just fine as long as there was a Whole Foods next door, because coconut oil’s got you covered.

I’ve done a Whole 30 challenge, which is a no-processed food crossed with a tinge of Paleo, so I’m no stranger to coconut oil. I’ve cooked brussels sprouts in it, stirred it in my coffee, used it to make paleo pancakes. They were good.

Sadly, at the end of a jar I have to say my life has not substantially changed. Everything broken in me before is still broken. Coconut oil, while delicious and no doubt healthier than, say, margarine, has not eliminated my need for my allergy inhaler. I asked my doctor if I could try shoving coconut oil up my nose instead, just for a little while. It’s way cheaper than Dymista. She didn’t think much of the idea. When I told her I was just joking, then she sighed and said, “I get that question a lot.”

While coconut oil is unsurprisingly gaining steam in veterinary medicine, we have an equivalent that already enjoys legendary status in the home remedy category: pumpkin.

pumpkin

Long treated as the pet pepto-bismol, pumpkin is the go-to far various GI maladies spanning the range from constipation to diarrhea. It’s a great thing for the colon. It’s a great source of fiber and most pets will eat it. Pumpkin is Metamucil in a more holistic package.

What pumpkin is not is everything else, like an anti-emetic or anti-inflammatory or something that will teach your dog to talk. Like, it’s no coconut oil or anything.

On a friend’s Facebook page, she recently asked if it was possible for a pet to develop an allergic reaction to a food they’ve been eating for years.

10 people chimed in (correctly) that yes, this happens. Then someone said, “Why do you ask?”

“Because my dog’s been throwing up every time he eats all of a sudden.”

As a veterinarian, my mind immediately collates a list of the differentials when I hear something like this. 3 year old pit bull, history of being a destructive chewer, clearly the problem is “pumpkin deficiency.”

Which is exactly where the comment thread went.

“OMG! You need to give your dog some pumpkin.”

“Seriously! My dog loves it.”

“Pumpkin cured my dog’s farts.”

“Pumpkin is a great source of electrolytes.” And so on and so forth.

Don’t get me wrong, I like pumpkin. As far as advice on the internet goes, it’s one of the more benign things I’ve read and unlikely to cause harm. My only concern is that people recommend this in lieu of something that might actually work, such as starting with a correct diagnosis. Fortunately this person has multiple veterinary professionals on the thread, and somewhere in between pumpkin recommendations she got some solid advice.

A couple of weeks ago, my neighbor came over with her adorable 6 month old Golden Retriever. She hopped back and forth on her toes before asking me if I had any thoughts about her dog’s diarrhea.

“How long has it been going on?” I asked.

“Two days.”

“Go to the vet.”

“We’re going tomorrow,” she said, “but in the meantime……do you have any pumpkin I can borrow?”

I did. It’s on the shelf next to the coconut oil. Hope springs eternal.

 

PS The dog improved dramatically … once the vet diagnosed Giardia and started Flagyl.

Filed: Blog, Cats, Daily Life, Dogs, Health, Musings, Picks of the Litter Tagged: , ,
  • Deborah Mendez

    Brilliant post!

  • http://www.freezertofield.com Joanne McGonagle

    Great post. I can think of one other thing too. Raw diets. Cures everything.

    • http://www.pawcurious.com Dr. V

      That’s like saying Voldemort. Do not mention the Feed Who Must Not Be Named.

      • Joanna

        Hahaha, that made my day :)

  • Cathey Avery

    Totally awesome post – we Americans, we do want the easy, read FAST, fix. And I, too, have both coconut oil and a can of pumpkin in my pantry. Even smart people are sometimes “not so much!” Thanks for the reminder, Dr. V!

  • Arrooh

    Well done article. Yes snake oil. I would like to say for ‘me’ I started eating a teaspoon of natural very local honey (neighbor of mine’s) and almost all of my sneezy allergies have gone. I used to take an allergy pill every night – now none.

    • http://www.pawcurious.com Dr. V

      I’ve recommended that to people before- I’ve heard it works well for some pets too. A place for everything and limit for everything too!

  • SeattleDogSpot

    Dr. V – What about industrial grade hemp? Lots of people are saying it helps with joint inflammation and chronic pain. Do you know if it’s really effective?

  • Joanna

    We don’t seem to have this pumpkin fascination in Australia, but I am regularly lectured about the evils of commercial pet food from certain pet owners who are obviously more educated on animal health that me, a mere veterinarian. Or maybe they got their scientific facts from a breeder…

    • CanineCancer.org.au

      Well I am in Aus and I know of one rescue group that is recommending pumpkin for ALL their cats that have diarrhea with blood in it. Guess that is a cost saving exercise on their part.

  • http://fur-licity.blogspot.com/ Barbara

    where can I get one of those hair growing hats? :-D