Building up strength

It’s a little paradoxical, but one’s caloric needs can actually increase after surgery when you’re in that low-activity healing phase. It takes extra energy to rebuild tissue and heal.

So because of that, I increased Koa’s daily ration since her Wednesday surgery. Her lipoma that turned out to be a nerve sheath tumor involved a pretty yucky surgery- I took out a good deal of tissue over her shoulder, and even with that I’m not sure if my margins were adequate. Her body has some work to do to repair that wound- all the more reason to be giving her a good quality, higher protein food during this phase.

I have to review the biopsy report when it comes back and decide whether I want to even consider a consultation with the radiation oncologist for follow up if needed. I did that with Mulan after finding her oral melanoma, and it was SO hard on her. It was a different tumor in a different location, with a different prognosis so I have to not let that experience cloud my judgment too much, but it’s hard. Decisions, decisions.

Koa was at 75.5 pounds the day of surgery, so we will see where she is at on Wednesday. I know she was less than thrilled about the surgery, but I hope the extra TLC and extra nibbles somewhat makes up for it.

On an entirely unrelated note, now that Brody is also eating Nulo I find that I am running out much, much more quickly. Due to whatever quirks of metabolism and activity these dogs have, he gets almost twice as much as she does. He isn’t complaining.

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  • http://animals.change.org Stephanie Feldstein

    This is typically the drive-thru phase in my house … where I load up on burgers to add to their dinner to keep them happy and eating :).

    My oldest dog, Juno (shepherd mix, around 13 years old), had one of those nerve sheath tumors in that tricky spot by her front elbow. We ended up opting for a second surgery with an oncological surgeon, instead of radiation. It’s been over a year, and there’s no sign of recurrence or any other related problems. Good luck, Koa!

  • Lisa W

    Get better Koa!!!! Puppy prayers are coming your way!

  • lggbie

    I hope that Koa is ok! I don’t know how common these tumors are or what their treatment regimens consist of, but I am hopeful you found it early and have bought her lots and lots of quality time at chez Curious.

  • http://furrydancecats.blogspot.com Teri and the cats of Furrydance, including fellow Nulo fan, Disco

    We have our paws crossed for Koa and thought your post was very informative with regards to the extra caloric needs that one needs to heal…